An Insightful Speech From An Unexpected Place

An Insightful Speech From An Unexpected Place

This morning I got up to find a video that was insightful from a person that I had not expected. It is from the actor that brought us Dude Where’s My Car and That 70’s Show, Ashton Kutcher. Not only did he give this talk, but he did it in a place where he had a huge platform to share it at: The MTV Teen Choice Awards. His third point was somewhat related to tiny house living, so I thought I’d share with you the video

Maximizing Space With Under Bed Storage

Maximizing Space With Under Bed Storage

Tiny house owners are all too used to the struggle of making space. If you’re a bit low on real estate to start with, finding room for storage generally requires some ingenuity and elbow grease.

One of the best ways to fit some extra items in is to head under the bed. An awful lot of homeowners either ignore or improperly use this valuable bit of space – a major mistake when you’ve got so little to spare.

Don’t let that be you. Learn to make effective use of all the potential storage spots at your disposal. When figuring out how to best outfit your bed, there are a few things to keep in mind. read more

New Book: Prefabulous Small Houses with Foreword by Robert Redford

New Book: Prefabulous Small Houses with Foreword by Robert Redford

To people who are unfamiliar with the new home industry (including tiny homes), the word “prefab” has a negative, bargain-basement connotation. Modular, prefabricated homes have come a long way in the last decade and author Sheri Koones’ new book shows the best of “prefabulous” small homes.

Prefabulous Small Houses is the latest book by author Sheri Koones.

Prefabulous Small Houses by The Taunton Press features 32 modest sized cottages and homes ranging from 350 to 2,500 square feet. The readers of the Tiny House Blog will of course gravitate toward the smaller versions, but all the designs show what is now available in prefab architecture. read more

Small House on Gabriola Island, British Columbia

Small House on Gabriola Island, British Columbia

This small 576 square foot house is located on Gabriola Island in British Columbia and has two stories, a 24′ by 24′ footprint, type-3 septic field, instant hot water heater, and cork floors. The landscaping around the house was finished in river rock so as to avoid having to water lawn. The photos, plan, and video below were sent to me by it’s owners, Michael and Kathy.

I was happily surprised to learn that a building permit was issued without requiring the drilling of a well on the property first. It seems that rainwater collection systems are not only well understood in that area but preferred because they put less of a burden on natural resources. Here is what Michael says about rain water collection systems in British Columbia. read more

What It Takes To Put On The Largest Tiny House Event Ever

Now that the first Tiny House Conference has come to a close and I’ve had some time to reflect on how it went, what I’d like to do differently next year etc. I thought it would be good to share a little bit about what goes into one of these events. I wanted to do a post like this in part to share how much time, money and effort goes into the Tiny House Conference and to answer some common questions such as: “why do I have to register?”, “why does it cost so much?”, “could you just send me a video link?” read more

Work Exchange Opportunity at Dancing Rabbit Ecovillage

Work Exchange Opportunity at Dancing Rabbit Ecovillage

Ziggy (Brian Liloia) let me know about an upcoming work exchange opportunity coming this summer at the Dancing Rabbit Ecovillage. Ziggy and a few others are building a 350 square foot cooperative kitchen.

It will be built with a roundwood timber frame structure and straw bale and cob walls. Those who partake in this project should get some good first hand experience with several truly sustainable building techniques while being fully immersed in life at Dancing Rabbit. Thanks again for the tip Ziggy! read more

PAD Tiny House Design Workshop

PAD Tiny House Design Workshop

I received a note from my friend Dee Williams about an upcoming workshop and wanted to share it with you as the time is fast approaching. I wish I could make this one personally as it would be a lot of fun and is near where my daughter lives. Here is what Dee has to say.

Hey there!

I wanted to drop a note to ask a favor. I know you’re swamped and in the middle of your normal awesome life, but I wanted to let you know about some up coming workshops being hosted through Portland Alternative Dwellings (www.padtinyhouses.com). It seems there’s a rush of activity right now with great workshops on the horizon, hosted by Jay Shafer’s new company Four Lights Houses, Yestermorrow Design Build School, Tumbleweed, Deek Deitrickson’s Relaxashacks, and others. read more

Wine Bottle Cork Floor – Phoenix Commotion

I was looking through all the amazing ways the folks at the Phoenix Commotion are reusing junk to build artful homes in Texas. This technique jumped out at me as an especially clever and beautiful way of reusing what is normally discarded as trash. This is a wine bottle cork floor. Each cork is carefully nailed to the floor in an organic pattern.

If you’re unfamiliar with the Phoenix Commotion this is what they say about themselves:

The Phoenix Commotion is a local building initiative created to prove that constructing homes with recycled and salvaged materials has viable place in the building industry. This process uses only apprentice labor and teaches marketable skills to anyone with a work ethic who is willing to swing a hammer. By keeping labor costs low and using donated or found materials, the homes created are truly affordable. No two are alike due to the myriad of materials used, so there is an artistic element that makes Phoenix Commotion homes truly unique. We target single parents, artists, and families with low incomes. We require the homeowner to be involved with the planning and construction of their own home. The result is a person who is empowered, not only by the use of knowledge and building skills, but by the opportunity to become part of a community as a vested participant. read more