Inge & Jørn Built the North Of The Sun Cabin from Driftwood and other Cast-off Materials

Inge & Jørn Built the North Of The Sun Cabin from Driftwood and other Cast-off Materials

Inge Wegge (25) and Jørn Ranum (22) spent nine months of cold, Norwegian winter in the isolated and uninhabited bay of a remote, arctic island by the coast of Northern-Norway, facing nothing but the vast Atlantic Ocean. There they built a cabin out of driftwood and other cast-off materials that washed up on shore.” – Tiny House Swoon

See more of the completed North Of The Sun Cabin

House On a Mountainside by Keiichi Hayashi

 House On a Mountainside by Keiichi Hayashi

This small house rises above the trees on a forested hillside. To take full advantage of the available views, architect Keiichi Hayashi stacked the rooms vertically, creating a simple tall box of a house. Working with the slope, he opted for a split-level plan that divides the 96 m2 (1,033 ft2) of space over a total of six levels, each dedicated to a single function. Starting at the bottom, they are the entry foyer, children’s bedroom, bathroom, parent’s bedroom, living room, and kitchen/dining room at the top of the house. The six levels are connected by a switchback staircase in the middle of the small floor plan. read more

The New Ephemeral Architecture of Burning Man

The New Ephemeral Architecture of Burning Man

For the past few years, I’ve been documenting the tiny houses of Black Rock City (BRC for short). BRC is the city where the participants of the annual Burning Man event live for a week or more. “Burners” design, build, pitch or tow their unique structures and homes out to the Nevada desert to protect themselves from the area’s harsh weather.

Black Rock City is the temporary home for thousands of Burning Man participants.

This year I was unable to make it to Burning Man. However, my friend and BRC neighbor, Philippe Glade, is always there with his trusty camera to capture the colorful construction for his blog, This is Black Rock City. Furthermore, this year he also updated his popular book and The New Ephemeral Architecture of Burning Man is now available online and in selected stores in San Francisco ($40, Real Paper Books). read more

Bamboo Home

It’s great to see projects coming full circle, from concept to reality. I first posted about this ingenious design by HP&P Architects back in April of 2013 (you can read the original post here). Since then H&P have completed their first floating bamboo home, aptly named “blooming bamboo home”. In this particular region of Vietnam locals houses are often destroyed due to flooding and natural disasters.” – Humble Homes

See inside and continue reading…

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Self-Sufficiency on 1/4 Acre

A tiny house on a tiny plot of land. It’s an ideal scenario for a good portion of tiny house dwellers and soon-to-be tiny house dwellers. Since owning a tiny house, in a sense, is being financially self-sufficient, owning the land it sits on takes that level of self-suffiency one step further. Since a tiny house obviously takes up a very small amount of land, there will be some remaining land even on the smallest plots.

Powering your shed – We love sheds

Kevin from the Solar Shed wrote this guest post for We Love Sheds.

“Over the years, Shed men and women have often pondered as to how to power up their wooden edifices, and be able to see when its dark, stay warm in the winter when preparing the ‘plot’, make a brew and all the other things that shed folk would like, to make life easier.”

Read the full article: Shed Week Guest post: Powering your shed — shedblog.co.uk – We love sheds.

Sidecountry Sessions Tiny House

Sidecountry Sessions Tiny House

If you live in a ski town, keep an eye out for a truck towing an elegant tiny house and five ski bums on the lookout for some great powder and free Wi-Fi. For six weeks, Molly Baker, Zack Griffin, Neil Provo and their videographers Sam Griffin and Andy Walbon will be road tripping around North America in a 112 square foot house on wheels and will be posting their videos online. The idea behind the trip is to find grassroots ambassadors for the outdoor gear company, Outdoor Research, ski some of winter’s best deep powder and meet fellow ski enthusiasts. They also wanted to take this trip in a tiny house to show that a passionate and low-impact lifestyle could be had for little cost. read more

Birds’ Hill Cottage

 Birds' Hill Cottage

A coastal rainforest surrounds Birds’ Hill Cottage in British Columbia. The vacation rental cottage is located on Salt Spring Island, a 90-minute ferry ride from Vancouver.

With its board siding and peeled log porch posts, the exterior looks to my eye more like a classic cabin than a cottage. The inside, on the other hand, definitely says cottage with its white-painted board finishes accented by natural wood.

This is a contemporary cottage, however, with an open-concept living area and soaring cathedral ceiling. Although the log post adds a rustic touch, it is countered by the modern flair of the concrete floors and counter tops. read more

Sacromonte Caves

Sacromonte Caves

Continuing down from the land of the hórreos in Asturias, the southern region of Andalucía has its own rustic shelters that—instead of sheltering corn and hay—have become homes for modern nomads. The Sacromonte neighborhood of Granada has a series of caves that were once inexpensive homes for the city’s Roma community in the late 19th century, but are now utilized by the city’s artistic dwellers. Most visitors come to Granada for the UNESCO world heritage site, the Alhambra, and the funky Albaicín neighborhood. The Sacromonte area lies just above the city along a hillside and once contained over 3,600 inhabited caves. A flood in the 1960s wiped out many of the homes and what was left is now occupied by approximately 30-50 nomad residents from all over the world. Many are just passing through, hoping to extend their travels by selling their art in the city plazas, while some of the ancient caves are occupied full time. Essentially, most of the people living in the caves are squatters overlooked by the local government. Their Bohemian looks and local art including jewelry, baskets, pottery and weavings can be seen in the local plazas. Traditinal flamenco music and dances can be seen in theaters and restaurants in the Albaicín. The living conditions in the caves are basic. Most of the caves have electricity from local power lines or solar panels. Plumbing and toilets are sometimes shared between several residents. However, the caves do stay cool during Granada’s hot summers and you really can’t beat the view. read more